Royal Caribbean International: Allure of the Seas

The Royal Caribbean Allure of the Seas is truly an amazing cruise ship that aims to captivate guests with first class services and establishments. This new cruise ship also features the first Starbucks at sea, the hit wonder Chicago Musical, and ever creative DreamWorks Experience in which your favorite animated characters are along board. If you are looking for a place to dine in, then it’s best to visit Rita’s Cantina and Samba Grill Brazilian Steakhouse. Also, if you want Quality time with your family, you can always visit the Boardwalk, Aqua Theater, and Central Park. Everything you need is right in this cruise ship.

Rest and Relaxation

There are plenty of stuffs to do while you are boarding The Royal Caribbean Allure of the Seas. In case you want to unwind and relax, one can visit the Spa and Fitness center.

· Visit the renowned Vitality Spa wherein one could choose unique treatment programs such as medi-spa treatments and acupuncture.

· If you are health conscious then the Fitness Center will accommodate your needs.

· Central Park – features an open-air garden with BRITTO Gallery, Coach Store, and bistros.

· New Library to educate feed your thoughts and a Card room to socialize.

· Go on a splash! There are 4 pools including the Solarium and 10 whirlpools wherein 2 are distinct because it’s overlooking the sea.

· Clubs and Lounges for you to chill out.

Action and Adventure

This impressive cruise ship offers every family distinctive action and adventure activities. If you want to get thrilled then you must not miss these highlights:

· 2 well-known Flow Rider surf simulator and Rock-climbing walls.

· Zip line – measures 9 decks in the air and 82 feet diagonally.

· A full-sized basketball field and boxing ring

· Ice-skating Arena

· Compact Golf Course

· Distinctive Handcrafted Carousel

Dining Information

The cruise ship is packed with exquisite cuisine in which families can truly enjoy. The ship offer multi-course dining for breakfast, lunch and dinner. There are also other dining options that families could choose from.

· Main Dining Room which serves daily meals for every families and guests.

· 13 other dining options including Windjammer Café, Park Café, Boardwalk Dog House and it features room service.

· First ever Starbucks at sea

· New restaurants including The Cupcake Cupboard – classic connoisseur bakery and serve 30 unique cupcakes.

· Casual dining at Johnny Rockets, Cupcake Cupboard, and many more.

· Specialty cafeterias like Chops Grille steakhouse, 150 Central Park, Giovanni’s Table Italian Restaurant, and Samba Grill Brazilian Steakhouse offer menus at a low price fee.

· Izumi Asian Cuisine for sushi bar selection and a la carte style. Vintages Wine Bar that serves exquisite wines.

· NEW Central Park Dining Package at $70 per guest.

· NEW Chef’s Dining Package at $130 per guest.

· NEW Choice Dining Package at $80 per guest.

Kids and Families

A family getaway is not complete without overall enjoyment. Allure of the Seas presents the spectacular DreamWorks Experience that features cartoon characters, parades, story time and parties.

Here are other highlights:

· Award-winning Adventure Ocean Youth Program. This program is indeed very essential for your youngsters for educational and fun purposes.

· Royal Babies and Royal Tots especially prepared for your toddlers and it features Fisher Price activities.

· Royal Babies & Tots Nursery

· Family-friendly Activities – This includes instructional classes and lectures, challenges and competitions, and many more.

· H20 Zone – kiddies water park

· 3D Movie Theater

· Adventure Beach kiddy pool with water slide.

· Lounge Areas and Disco – Exclusive for your Teens.

Entertainment and Shopping

If you are looking for entertain then the Broadway hit musical Chicago, Aqua Theater shows, ice shows and other live entertainments will definitely suit your preferences. Furthermore, here are other important highlights of the Royal Caribbean Allure of the Seas:

· Broadway Hit Musical Chicago – If you like musical then this group will truly entertain you.

· Aqua Theater shows and other live entertainment

· Casino Royale – has an area of 18,000 sq. foot and it accommodates 456 slots and 27 tables.

· Entertainment clubs and lounges -this includes karaoke and comedy bar, jazz club, as well as live performances.

· Surf’s Up Party – A restaurant that offers guests beverages and serves popular dishes.

· Central Park and Royal Promenade-the shopping center; store includes Duty Free, Coach, BRITTO Gallery, etc.

· NEW Rita’s Fiesta – reservation-only themed party and it features exquisite dishes and non-alcoholic beverages.

· NEW Prohibition Party – reservation-only 1920’s themed celebration. It features jazz age outfits.

Set sail and enjoy life to the fullest. The Royal Caribbean Allure of the Seas first-class service will surely satisfy your needs.

Cruising the Great South Bay on the Moon Chaser

Despite what may be Long Island residents’ roots set in sedentary cement, there is nothing like a cruise on the Great South Bay to offer an aquatic alternative to their view and enable them to briefly adopt a tourist’s perspective of the area they call home. It was this philosophy that lured me from land to sea on the “Moon Chaser” excursion boat from Captree State Park on a recent mid-July day.

“Captree State Park (itself) is located at the eastern tip of the narrow beach known as Jones Beach Island,” according to its self description. “This ideal location, at the intersection of the Fire Island inlet and the State Boat Channel, places it within easy access of some of the finest bay and ocean fishing grounds on the East Coast and provides for an extremely scenic view of the Great South Bay and the western end of Fire Island, including the Fire Island Lighthouse, the Fire Island Coast Guard Station, the Robert Moses State Park Water Tower, and the Inlet Span Bridge.”

The park offers a snack bar, a nautically-themed, full-service restaurant, a bait and tackle shop, and two fishing piers for land-launched lines.

The area on this dry, flawlessly blue, 80-degree day said summer on Long Island. The air was suffused with the sound of seagulls, which flapped, flocked, and flew, and the scent of the sea. The parking lot on the concrete side yielded to the one on the aquatic side, as a line of mostly fishing boats–Long Island’s largest fleet of them, in fact–bowed into the dock, including the “Capt. Eddie B. III,” the “Spectrum,” the “North Star II,” and the “Bay Princess II.”

Water lapped at the deck. The seagulls sang. And fishing rods projected from everyone, as if they constituted their third arms.

Designed and constructed by the Blount Marine Corporation, of Warren, Rhode Island, and launched in 1982, the blue-and-white “Moon Chaser” vessel intended for my own nautical excursion, stretched 65 feet, accommodated up to 220 on two decks, and was tied to the furthest pier from the restaurant complex.

A short line in front of its mobile ticket booth, as occurred every Wednesday and Thursday afternoon in the summer, indicated a complement of about 25 on its trip today.

A laborious engine grind signaled its 13:00 departure and a brief backward jolt preceded a 180-degree turn and trace through the buoy-lined channel, as the Captree Boat Basin receded in the sunlight.

Mimicking the “Moon Chaser’s” course, two other, fishing excursion destined boats trailed it, riding its wake, while two inbound vessels, the “Laura Lee” and the “Captree Princess,” made their approaches.

Settling into a gentle sway, the “Moon Chaser” itself glided over the sun-glinted blue bay, paralleling Fire Island National Seashore.

One of the proverbial bread slices, along with Long Island itself, it ensured that the 45-mile-long Great South Bay remained sandwiched between landmasses and thus protected from the Atlantic, whose access was provided by the inlet between Jones Beach Island’s eastern and Fire Island’s western ends.

Native to the area were the Meroke Tribes, but the earliest settlers were those from Europe, who encountered them in the 17th century, eventually establishing a succession of south shore bay towns, based upon boating and fishing, including Lindenhurst, Babylon, Islip, Oakdale, Sayville, Bayport, Blue Point, Patchogue, Bellport, Shirley, and Mastic Beach.

Managing to pierce the otherwise bright day, the lens atop the black-and-white towered Fire Island Lighthouse blinked at the boat as it inched toward it, abreast of the sand and scrub shoreline off the starboard side.

Appearing like an uninterrupted pattern of projected fishing poles wrapped around its deck, the “Island Princess,” anchored a short distance away, passed off to port.

Established on September 11, 1964, when Congress designated 26 miles of Fire Island as a national seashore, that narrow tract of land today encompasses 17 residential communities, New York’s only federally deemed wilderness, marine and upland habitat, wildlife, beaches, recreational facilities, and several historic sights.

Toting itself, it invites the visitor to “immerse yourself in an enchanting collage of coastal life and history. Rhythmic waves, high dunes, ancient maritime forests, historic landmarks, and glimpses of wildlife, Fire Island has been a special place for diverse plants, animals, and people for centuries. Far from the pressure of big city life, dynamic barrier island beaches offer both solitude and camaraderie, and spiritual renewal.”

While the Statue of Liberty was the symbolic entry to New York Harbor, the Fire Island Lighthouse was the actual one since the 19th century, guiding transatlantic ships and those transporting the millions of European immigrants from the Old World to the new.

The initial, 74-foot-high structure serving this purpose, a cream colored octagonal pyramid of Connecticut River blue split stone constructed in 1826 at the island’s end, certainly marked the inlet, but did not necessarily serve the purpose. Too short, in fact, to do so, it was dismantled when Congress appropriated $40,000 in 1857 for a 168-foot, creamy yellow replacement that sported a red brick tower and was first lit on November 1 of the following year, although stone from the original was incorporated in its terrace.

Reflecting technological advancement, it employed several methods, including whale oil, land oil, mineral oil, kerosene, and, finally, electricity, as of September 20, 1938, to fuel its four concentric Funk lamps housed in its First Order Fresnel lens to produce one-minute interval flashes.

Like many devices in history, however, it entered a period that would later see it coming full cycle.

Decommissioned as a navigation aid on December 31, 1973, it was replaced by an inadequate facsimile-a small flash tube optic installed on top of the Robert Moses State Park Water Tower. But its singular, seaward-direction shine failed to serve any purpose for Great South Bay plying vessels, and private citizen support, gaining momentum during the second half of the 1970s, led to the formation of the Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society in 1982.

After significant fund collections facilitated its restoration to its 1939 appearance, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 and, completing its cycle, was reinstated as an official navigation aid two years later, on Memorial Day, casting its guiding light onto the bay when it was relit.

Today, two 1,000-watt, counter-clockwise rotating bulbs provide flashes every 7.5 seconds and are visible up to 24 miles away.

Separate from, but complementary to, the United States Lighthouse Service, the Lifesaving Service established its own station, which was constructed in 1848 on the island’s west end, not far from the location of the original lighthouse itself. Both were created to patrol the coastline for watercraft stormed, stranded, or stuck, and facilitate rescues, the latter by mostly volunteer baymen and farmers between October and May.

Seven such stations eventually lined Fire Island by 1854.

Their value was not to be underestimated, however: between 1871 and 1915, more than 7,000 people were rescued from 721 ships.

Dipping deeper into the now darker blue surface, the “Moon Chaser” spit foamy white reactions from its sides each time its bow plunged into the water for a gulp. A wisp of thin cloud, like whipped cream, hung across the eastern sky.

Continuing to parallel Fire Island, the boat cruised past its communities, as if they were notches that silently ticked by. From Robert Moses State Park, it moved past Kismet, Saltair, and Fair Harbor.

Those wishing to have lunch on board had several options, including doing so before sailing at Captree’s lower snack bar; upper level, nautically-themed restaurant, the Captree Cove; having either prepare something to be taken away; or bringing a box lunch of the passenger’s own. Choosing the latter and maintaining the cruise’s natural sea-and-air theme, I took a vegetarian approach, enjoying cream cheese on date nut bread, honey roasted almonds, and cheese puffs at one of the main deck tables. Chips, soft drinks, and alcoholic beverages were purchasable from the bar, located on the same level, although many elected to take them to the upper canopied sun deck.

The Fire Island communities continued to slip by off the starboard side: Ocean Beach, Seaview, Ocean Bay Park.

Envisioned as a community for retired New York City police- and firemen, the latter pursued a divergent path when World War II-necessitated gas rationing and international travel restrictions prompted residents to seek “area-backyard” alternatives-in this case, Point O’ Woods domestic servants planted the first seeds of this eventual vacation resort when they used it as an after-work gathering place.

Partly employing its already established foundation, the community transformed the existing Coast Guard stations into the present-day Fire Island Hotel and Flynn’s Restaurant, re-purposing them and reflecting its accurate self-description.

“The architecture of Ocean Bay Park tends to be modest, but with character,” it says.

All its residential streets were named after lakes.

Considering its compact, 350-home encompassment, it is particularly rich in services, including a grocery store, a bicycle shop, a tennis court, two hotels, and several restaurants. Flynn’s, of the latter type, has its own 50-slip marine and is the destination of the “Moon Chaser” on select weekday evenings for a package that includes a lobster buffet dinner.

Again according to its own description, “Ocean Bay Park is a small town with a big personality. Largely populated by share houses, it knows how to throw a beach barbecue blowout. The riotous weekend warrior reputation is reinforced by the serious drinking and all-night dancing at Flynn’s, Schooner, and The Inn Between. The town’s laid back, nonrestrictive lifestyle is especially appreciated by the waves of young renters seeking a beach party environment. However, Ocean Bay Park also has its share of longtime seasonal residents.”

Serving as the halfway point, it marked the “Moon Chaser’s” 180-degree arc to port, swaying, like a seesaw, as it negotiated the wake of passing speedboats. A Bay Shore originating ferry passed astern and tucked itself into its Ocean Bay Park dock.

Maintaining a westerly heading and leaving its own white and dark green churn behind its stern, it inched toward the erector set resembling Robert Moses Bridge that spanned the bay and now loomed in the distance. Subjected to nature’s silent tug-of-war, upper deck passengers witnessed the hot sun’s competition with the breeze’s cooling cut.

Gliding over the dull blue, glass-resembling surface, the “Moon Chaser” passed to the left of East and West Fire islands, before reducing speed and entering the buoy-lined channel, abreast of the intensely green, seemingly floating patches of shellfish dependent eelgrass.

Now down to only a few knots per hour, it initiated its left arc into the basin and made contact with the Captree dock from which it had departed an hour and a half before.

Stepping off the boat, I had, in many ways, been refreshed by the air, the sun, the sea, the breeze, and the view-especially the view-by rediscovering, as a temporary tourist, a lifetime resident’s own backyard during a season that defined it-summer on the Long Island’s Great South Bay.

What Are the Differences Between Travel Agent and Tour Operator?

The Travel Agent and Tour Operators are normally two separate service providers handling different parts of journey, not always exclusive but the difference does lies in the service they provide.

From consumer point of view the big change happened in 1992, since then any one who is offering the services for travels are liable based upon their stake and expected profit which they are expecting. This is great development for the consumer side as now financial responsibly for the potential liability is divided into every party responsible.

The Tour Operators provide much more detailed services which you require from every little thing during the visit. It might not seem a huge difference but the both of these parties are at different end in case of any liability etc. As the travel agents don’t have huge stakes to the whole journey, being just a go between, so they are taking commission for their services. Incase of the dissatisfaction or problem they might not be facing huge lawsuits as they are not the primary sellers.

The main difference between is that the scope. The Travel Agents provide the specific services unless one asks for them to handle other things, they act as go between the airlines and travelers. It is expected that the travel agents most of times have business inside their own office and don’t have any stakes in the running of tours, or are not attached with the actual facilities and services.

The difference between Agent and Tour Operator can also be seen in the way they are being paid. The agents are given commission for their services for the normal things like air tickets etc. The bill of agent is often very small as compare to.

The services of both the tour operator and travel agents are essentially related so some of the organizations start to take both the activities. This however rarely occurs as the tasks of Tour Operators are huge as compare to the Travel Agent.

Celebrity Cruise Vacation Reviews

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Celebrity cruise vacation reviews acts as a resource of information for vacationers who are planning to have a perfect cruise vacation. They provide assistance for all your cruise needs ranging from ship information, different cruise deals, to discounts. In cruise vacation reviews, people share their unforgettable travel experience which in turn actively guide and encourage others to take a cruise vacation.

All you need to know about Celebrity cruise vacations is available in Celebrity cruise vacation reviews. Reviews include traveling tips from experienced cruise vacationers as well as people with first hand experience of Celebrity cruise lines. Besides, they provide travelers information about different cruise vacations such as luxury cruises, honeymoon cruises, and family cruises.

In addition to the above, Celebrity cruise vacation reviews cover all aspects of cruise vacation packages including accommodation, room service, meals, itineraries, entertainment activities, and offshore excursions.

Prior to going on a cruise vacation, it is very important to go through cruise vacation reviews as it assists in your vacation preparations. Go online to check Celebrity cruise vacation reviews. There are travel journals and travelogues with attractive photographs that provide informative tips on Celebrity cruise vacations.

With useful information and traveling tips, Celebrity cruise vacation reviews help first-time travelers to have a memorable experience.

How To Compare and Evaluate Cruise Deals and Cruise Packages

When it comes to the fine art of evaluation, there is always the fear that a deal of some kind will be made hollow because of compromise. For those evaluating cruise deals and packages, the idea of having to compromise means one thing — you’re missing out on something. This could not be further from the truth. Being a smart consumer means looking at every aspect of a prospective product to be purchased. The same goes for cruises. You want to be sure to investigate all that goes into finding the right trip for you.

The question, though, becomes a matter of knowing how said evaluation will take place. Sure, there are cruise veterans that know the industry & its mannerisms fairly well, but there are many others who simply have little to no experience finding an ideal cruise package.

First, look at the prospective dates involved in the trip. The first step in finding the right trip for you involves finding dates that actually match your travel time. More often than not, you’re operating from a specific set of dates the denotes your “vacation” days. You may find a tremendous deal on a cruise, but if the dates don’t work with your days off, it’s not really a deal for you.

You next want to look for any packages that include bundle pricing. As is the case with things like cable and phone services, the more items/services you can bundle, the more money you can save in the long run. An example of a bundled cruise package could include the accommodations on the ship, your ticket, meals & drinks, and entertainment/excursions. Taken separately, these items would probably be still available, but you’d probably be paying a little more. Here’s where looking at the numbers pays.

Don’t necessarily be taken in by the new and shiny. There are a number of bigger and bolder ships offering a dizzying array of amenities for its guests, but you aren’t the only person checking things out. Rather than fight for a spot that may not actually be there, look at deals & packages on ships that aren’t as new. They still get stellar ratings, provide top-notch amenities and service to their guests, and operate under tremendous safety records.

Finally, the best thing you can do in evaluating various cruise packages and deals is know when to walk away. Evaluation, as noted earlier, is an art, one forged through experience and a willingness to cry, “Foul” when necessary. Pricing on cruises can fluctuate quite a bit. In fact, savvy cruise shoppers will tell you that pricing can change from one day to the next. It pays to know when something just doesn’t feel right. As you compare one deal to another but you aren’t satisfied with either, that would be a golden opportunity to wait for something better (and better-priced) to come along.

Cruise deals are not hard to find. With a bit of gumption and tenacity, you, too, can find & book the trip of a lifetime.